*  Respect for
oneself

The practice of trail-running can entail risks and the search for performance and/or pleasure on no account justifies the distortion of one’s, more or less long term, good health.

Each runner will be particularly vigilant so as not to take any doping product and not to resort to the abusive use of self-medication. They must take care not to exceed their limits to the point of affecting their physical or moral integrity.

FAQ Performance Index and scoring

FAQ PERFORMANCE INDEX AND SCORING


Clicar en la pregunta para ver la respuesta.

  • Score A “Score” is given to each runner for every race they complete. Each person’s runner file profile consists of many different scores, corresponding to each race they have completed.
  • Performance Index– the individual scores of each runner are used to calculate their Performance Index. The performance index changes with the addition of new results and over time as races become older.
  • ITRA points– These points are awarded for finishing a race (1 – 6 points), each person who finishes the race receives the same number of points. This articlesoes notdiscuss ITRA points, it describesonlythe ITRA Performance Index.
  • The ITRA performance index is intended to provide a tool for evaluating the performance level of trail runners (based on their speed).
  • The performance index can be used to compare the speed of different trail runners around the world, including athletes who have never run in the same event.
  • The index corresponds to the maximum speed of each trail runner on a scale of 1000 points, corresponding to their performance against the theoretical world record for that distance.
  • The score for each race is calculated based on the finish time and the specific distance and elevation that particular race course.
  • For each race the distance + positive elevation gain + negative elevation gain is translated into an equivalent ‘flat’ distance.
  • This finish time is then compared with a theoretical best possible performance for this ‘flat distance’ and gives a result out of a possible 1000 points.
  • This result is then given a correction factor to account for the many technical factors related to trail running.
  • The same algorithm is used to calculate the score for all races.
  • A single correction factor is applied to all finishers of the same race, regardless of finish position.
  • The calculation of a score looks only at the finish time and does not use the finish position.
  • The performance index is calculated from the weighted mean of the 5 best scores achieved by a runner over the previous 36 months (for the general index or the index by category).
  • This weighting means the first result carries much more importance than the fifth.
  • It is impossible for an individual runner to calculate their performance index. The calculation is more complex than the simple average.
  • This period of 36 months is long enough to permit reliable statistical calculations and allow an injured runner to continue to appear in the performance index due to their previous performances.
  • To allow the performance index to be open to as many people as possible, as soon as a runner has completed one race, they appear in the performance index.
  • For runners who do not have 5 races, additional ‘simulated results’ are created for this athlete based on their best-known performance.
  • The combination of the actual results and simulated results allows the calculation of the runner’s performance index. This method means one race is enough for a runner to appear in the performance index.
  • Each time a result is simulated, the resultant simulated score is lower than the previous score.
  • This gives an advantage to runners who have multiple performances, while allowing inclusion of runners with less than 5 results.
  • As a result gets older, a negative weighting is applied to the race score when calculating the performance index.
  • For the first 12 months after a race, a result is given its full weighting in the calculation.
  • After the first 12 months, the value of this result in calculating the PI is progressively reduced each 6 months, until 36months when it is no longer used at all.
  • The table below shows how to interpret performance scores by category and gender, so that it is possible to define different categories of trail runners ranging from local level, to the top elite.
  • By using this table, a runner will be able to judge the level at which they are performing.
  • Organizer can also use this table to estimate the level of their race or to determine their policy regarding elite athlete registration.

There 2 categories for the Performance Index :
  • The general index: takes the weighted mean of the 5 best results, regardless of distance, for each runner over the previous 36 months.
  • The index by category: takes the weighted mean of the 5 best results, in one distance category, for each runner over the previous 36 months.
Trail running is a complex sport, the performance of each runner is influenced by many different factors, such as the technicality of the terrain, weather conditions, altitude and time of day.

We believe is it is impossible to objectively quantify the technicality of a race.

Our calculation uses an indirect method, based on the statistical analysis of runners using our database of more than 4.8 million individual results.

This statistical analysis allows us to determine a correction coefficient that adjusts the score.

Each race has its own adjustment coefficient, which is applied equally to all runners in that race. This method has two major advantages:

  • we can consider any factor influencing the race time
  • our data base and scoring system is constantly improved with every race.
General performance index,
The scores for every distance are decreased at the same rate.
Performance Index by distance category (S, L, XXL)
Scores for shorter races are decreased at a faster rate than for long races.

This is because ultra-distance runner will run far fewer races than a short-distance runner.

The score for a single race does not change over time, the negative coefficient is applied only in calculating the Performance Index.

This makes it possible to compare directly compare any of your race scores over any time period.

An update may be applied to the score of an individual race upon the receipt of new information, most commonly due to a change of course from the planned route to actual route.

Such adjustments are possible but infrequent.

New race scores appear in your runner account automatically. The overall performance index is updated once or twice weekly, hence recently released scores will not be immediately included in your performance index. Please check again in a few days.

If your Performance Index has not changed after a few days, it is because the new score is not significantly different from your existing scores/PI to make an overall change.

We apply the same calculation to every athlete in our database.

It is not possible for us to modify any one individual account, in this way you can be confident that when comparing scores each runners score was calculated in the exact same way.

Please be assured, the calculation will always give you the best possible score looking at all your results.

Your PI is made up of your top 5 results which are given a time weighted coefficient, therefore it is not always possible to determine from your raw PI scores which results are used for the General PI calculation.

For example; a new PI score of 500 can be used in place of an older score of 505. Please be assured, the calculation will always give you the best possible score looking at all your results.

We apply the same calculation to every athlete in our database. It is not possible for us to modify any one individual account. In this way you can be confident that when comparing scores, each runners score was calculated in the exact same way.

If the race is in our calendar and the results do not appear on our website it is because we have not received results from the organiser.

Once results are received from organisers, we publish results within 24-48hrs (this may be longer during peak season).

All race results must be submitted by the race organisers, we cannot accept individual results from runners.

The PI score is not based on your finish position in a race. The score you get on a race is directly related to your performance in terms of speed.

The position obtained is related to the level of competition of the race, not the speed of the performance.

At a same level of performance, you can finish 1st in a local race or 150th in an international race.

A runner’s performance index will not be affected by a slow race or a DNF!

If a score from one race is much lower than scores achieved in previous races, then this result will not be used in calculating the performance Index.

The PI is used to calculate the peak performance potential of an athlete, not the consistency, hence we believe that significantly lower performances should be ignored.

If you have less than 5 other results will use simulated results in the place of the low score.

Even if this result is listed in your runner profile under top 5 races, simulated results based on your previous results will be used for your PI calculation.

An identical calculation is applied for men and for women. It is therefore possible to directly the compare the performances of men with those of women, just as you would compare finish times in our sports.

To compare the level of performance of men and women within categories, the ITRA LEVEL CHART used. For example, elite men have a score above 825 and women above 700. This chart was created using statistical analysis of all the runners in our database.

There 2 categories for the Performance Index :
  • The general index: takes the weighted mean of the 5 best results, regardless of distance, for each runner over the previous 36 months.
  • The index by category: takes the weighted mean of the 5 best results, in one distance category, for each runner over the previous 36 months/
Trail running is a complex sport, the performance of each runner is influenced by many different factors, such as the technicality of the terrain, weather conditions, altitude and time of day.

We believe is it is impossible to objectively quantify the technicality of a race.

Our calculation uses an indirect method, based on the statistical analysis of runners using our database of more than 4.8 million individual results.

This statistical analysis allows us to determine a correction coefficient that adjusts the score. Each race has its own adjustment coefficient, which is applied equally to all runners in that race.

This method has two major advantages:
  • we can consider any factor influencing the race time
  • our data base and scoring system is constantly improved with every race

General performance index, The scores for every distance are decreased at the same rate.

Performance Index by distance category (S, L, XXL)

Scores for shorter races are decreased at a faster rate than for long races.

This is because ultra-distance runner will run far fewer races than a short-distance runner.

The score for a single race does not change over time, the negative coefficient is applied only in calculating the Performance Index.

This makes it possible to compare directly compare any of your race scores over any time period.

An update may be applied to the score of an individual race upon the receipt of new information, most commonly due to a change of course from the planned route to actual route.

Such adjustments are possible but infrequent.

New race scores appear in your runner account automatically.

The overall performance index is updated once or twice weekly, hence recently released scores will not be immediately included in your performance index. Please check again in a few days.

If your Performance Index has not changed after a few days, it is because the new score is not significantly different from your existing scores/PI to make an overall change.

We apply the same calculation to every athlete in our database.

It is not possible for us to modify any one individual account, in this way you can be confident that when comparing scores each runners score was calculated in the exact same way.

Please be assured, the calculation will always give you the best possible score looking at all your results.

Your PI is made up of your top 5 results which are given a time weighted coefficient, therefore it is not always possible to determine from your raw PI scores which results are used for the General PI calculation.

For example; a new PI score of 500 can be used in place of an older score of 505. Please be assured, the calculation will always give you the best possible score looking at all your results.

We apply the same calculation to every athlete in our database. It is not possible for us to modify any one individual account. In this way you can be confident that when comparing scores, each runners score was calculated in the exact same way.

Why doesn’t my race appear in my results file?

If the race is in our calendar and the results do not appear on our website it is because we have not received results from the organiser.

Once results are received from organisers, we publish results within 24-48hrs (this may be longer during peak season).

All race results must be submitted by the race organisers, we cannot accept individual results from runners.

The PI score is not based on your finish position in a race. The score you get on a race is directly related to your performance in terms of speed.

The position obtained is related to the level of competition of the race, not the speed of the performance.

At a same level of performance, you can finish 1st in a local race or 150th in an international race.

A runner’s performance index will not be affected by a slow race or a DNF!

If a score from one race is much lower than scores achieved in previous races, then this result will not be used in calculating the performance Index.

The PI is used to calculate the peak performance potential of an athlete, not the consistency, hence we believe that significantly lower performances should be ignored.

If you have less than 5 other results will use simulated results in the place of the low score. Even if this result is listed in your runner profile under top 5 races, simulated results based on your previous results will be used for your PI calculation.

An identical calculation is applied for men and for women. It is therefore possible to directly the compare the performances of men with those of women, just as you would compare finish times in our sports.

To compare the level of performance of men and women within categories, the ITRA LEVEL CHART used. For example, elite men have a score above 825 and women above 700. This chart was created using statistical analysis of all the runners in our database.

The score relates to the performance of a runner for a specific race in specific conditions and will depend many things not just on the distance and elevation profile.

Two races may be advertised with the same distance and the same elevation profile, but in reality differ quite considerably (technical difficulty of the course; the relationship of elevation gain to distance (4 x 1000 m or 8 x 500m) etc.).

Our statistical correction coefficient makes allowance for these differences as well as many other technical aspects. Therefore comparison between races is not possible.

A score is calculated for all races in our calendar upon the receipt of a complete and correct results files from the event organiser.

Exceptions: No score is calculated for the following races:
  • "Vertical KM"
  • Races where the number of effort points (distance + (elevation profile/100)) is less than 10.
    Eg. 8km +300m = 11 effort points – PI score. 5km +200m = 7 effort points – No PI score
  • Too many stages
  • The number of finishers is too low (approximately less than 5)
  • The data in the result file contains too many errors

Publishing of the results file is a free service; however, the results must be submitted according to the ITRA results format.

A free ITRA membership allows you to view a list of your previous races, to view your PI score for your top 5 races and statistical information related to your performances, such as rakings in your country, your General and distance specific Performance Index.

ITRA members who pay the annual subscription fee of 8Euros per year have access to their complete race history, and that of all the runners in the ITRA database. With this you can view and compare results with your favourite runners, friends and family.

You can search by distance, continent and country to see how you position and who holds the top rankings in your country.

If you recently completed a race and it is not shown in the ITRA calendar or list of results, you can contact the race organiser and ask them to submit the results to the ITRA website.

This must be completed by the race organiser who must first create an Organiser account. This process is a free service, a performance index score will be given but no ITRA points will be awarded.

This indicates that the result has been entered into our database but that the score is still being calculated.

Dependent upon the number of results to be processed, the updating and calculation of scores may take a little while.

We process the results as quickly as possible.

Our calculation includes a manual verification step, this means in peak race season may be scored slower than normal.

The Finisher Criteria corresponds to cut off time provided by the race organiser and is of particular interest to slower runners.

This Finisher Score represents the approximate Performance Index required to be able to finish the race within the time limit set by the race organiser.

By comparing the Finisher criteria to your own Performance Index, each runner will be able to judge their ability to be able to finish the race within the time limit.

More information on trail running and the distance categories can be found here. "Discovering Trail Running"
The performance index is based on your results, so as your performance level increases so will your scores, which will in turn increase your performance index.

Even if your highest score doesn’t increase, having more scores close to your maximum will reduce the simulated results and increase your score.

If you want to improve in one category, more races in that category will help to improve your score.

That said, you will perform better in races that suit your preferred style or races where you will be relatively faster than your competitors. If you are better at flat technical races, then you may score lower on hilly non-technical courses, if you are very good at single trail then you may be relatively slower on flat open trails.